family of parts

Managing Family of Parts

SNAG-0000

Family of Parts gives you control that SW’s Configurations don’t provide.

Last time we created a FoP table, and you get the idea of how you would go about creating a larger family.

One of the things you can do with an FoP is use the table to create a set of independent parts. Then you can control the parts using the table, or you can unlink the parts by deleting them from the table. A big benefit of the Edge system is that you can remove the part from the FoP but keep the part in the assembly, without losing any links to it. Read more on Managing Family of Parts…

How to set up a Family of Parts

SNAG-0000Here’s a little tutorial on how to create a family of parts from an initial part. First, you have to make sure that all of your dimensions are driving dimensions. In Solid Edge, driving dimensions are called “locked” and are usually signified with a lock symbol, and are red in color. Green dimensions are selected, but the Length dim is driving. Blue dimensions are unlocked, or driven. Before proceding, I had to fix the “headdia” dimension. Read more on How to set up a Family of Parts…

Configurations vs Family of Parts, Round 1

Solid Edge Family of Parts and Works Configurations don’t line up neatly for comparison. Edge even has a functionality called Configurations, but its best compared to Works Display States. I know this comparison is going to take more than one blog article to muddle through, but I’m gearing up to talking about SolidWorks Toolbox, one of the most controversial aspects of the software for users.

If we just limit the discussion to what it takes to create a library of standard parts, then the items we need to control are sizes controlled by table, and features turned on and off. This functionality is classic Family of Parts. It is also a small bit of what Works calls Configurations. Read more on Configurations vs Family of Parts, Round 1…

Help Me Identify Master Model Techniques

Before embarking on this design project, I want to make sure I understand the Master Model techniques available in Solid Edge. Regardless of the specifics of the project, this is the type of decision you have to make early on in the process. It affects the workflow throughout the rest of the project, so getting it wrong off the bat would mean a lot of “learning opportunities” later on if you know what I mean. It’s true that you learn more through failure than through success (by which measure I should be pretty smart by now), but it might not be the best idea to actually plan to fail. If I learn something up front, then I still learn it, and avoid the public embarrassment. Read more on Help Me Identify Master Model Techniques…

Family of Parts and Simplified Parts

Solid Edge has two separate functions that combine to do the equivalent job of SW Configurations. I’m just figuring this out, so it seems that other SW users probably haven’t seen this yet either. SW users use configurations in a lot of different ways. We use it to simplify parts, and we use it to make variations of a part. Solid Edge can do all of that, it just does it a little differently, and it uses the Simplified Parts and Family of Parts functions to do it.

Let’s start by seeing some of the details of Family of Parts. Read more on Family of Parts and Simplified Parts…

Configurations vs Family of Parts

This is a topic I want to open up to discussion from both sides of the aisle here, but in particular I’d like to hear from the Edgers. I see the theoretical advantages and disadvantages of the concept of “configurations” in SolidWorks, where many versions of a part can be stored within a single file. I’d like to hear about the advantages and disadvantages of the Solid Edge method for Family of Parts. Read more on Configurations vs Family of Parts…

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